Catering to a Seed


My Balcony Garden

Every morning I go on my balcony to see if the seeds I planted from my store bought cherry tomatoes have started to grow. Despite my desire to do things in a hurry, the seeds grow at their own pace, not mine. That I could be under the thumb of a little seed is a humbling experience. The seed doesn’t care about who I am, my race or my political/religious preferences or how much money I have or what my job is. For my little seed, there are other values, other priorities.

Every morning I talk to my planted seeds and when they start to sprout, I talk to them even more—mainly questions like did you get enough rest, do you need water, are you getting the right amount of sun, etc. I even caress them very gently. And if the seed doesn’t grow, I ask myself “where did I go wrong?”

The seeds have taught me that change is constant and, without change, nothing happens. Only via a constant metamorphoses can a tiny seed become something that will nourish and help keep us alive.

Change is important in other aspects of life as well. Take, for example, opinions. Opinions (which are not the same thing as principles and ethics) can adapt themselves to new experiences and the learning that comes from them. And since, hopefully, we are always adding to our experiences, our opinions should embrace change when necessary. That’s why many opinions we had when young are now démodé.

Unfortunately, there are those unwilling to adapt to the present tense. For example, those participating in protests against the coronavirus lockdown. Their minds, sterilized by dogma, cannot understand that some rules are meant to safeguard communal wellbeing.

In Italy, in only three months c. 130 doctors have died trying to save the lives of those infected by COVID-19. Their freedom to live was terminated, in part, by those who violated the lockdown and continued to spread infection. The protesters’ desire to put the lives of others at risk is not freedom but a calloused recklessness.

Dogma is deadly.

-30-

Related: Secret Life of Plants, Peter Thompkins’ book on Archive free reading + Me and Bobby McGee

 

About Art for Housewives

The Storyteller....
This entry was posted in Art Narratives, Rome/Italy and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Catering to a Seed

  1. Once again you have used a beautiful metaphor to make a point that needs to be made.

  2. Sherry says:

    sterilized by dogma!! love it

  3. Lyn Shakespeare says:

    Darling thank you for your posts. Yes so sad about the doctors. And the recklessness of some selfish people. Hope you are doing well. Love to you and Pierluigi . Can you change my email address to see below. Love to you xxxx
    NB: I have a new email address. The old one is no longer checked. Please use doll@lynshakespeare.com

    From: Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa <comment-reply@wordpress.com>
    Reply-To: Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa <comment+rhfpazo7b3l2_kzw3pszjr98@comment.wordpress.com>
    Date: Monday, 20 April 2020 at 8:20 PM
    To: Lyn Shakespeare <idoll@bigpond.net.au>
    Subject: [New post] Catering to a Seed

    Art for Housewives posted: ” Every morning I go on my balcony to see if the seeds I planted from my store bought cherry tomatoes have started to grow. Despite my desire to do things in a hurry, the seeds grow at their own pace, not mine. That I could be under the thumb of a little s”

  4. Thanks for the email update… Oh how I miss our sweet little island. Hope The Doll Is well and animated as always. Besitos

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